SSRL Events

rethink research: SSRL Research Methods Summer Institute

Plan to join us for rethink research, the SSRL Research Methods Summer Institute, May 1 - 12, 2017.

A unique and exciting training opportunity, rethink research consists of numerous hands-on, immersive workshops aimed at providing participants with practical, usable knowledge and skills in the social science research methods. Through a combination of lectures and hands-on exercises, including specialized software training, workshop participants will be exposed to a variety of methods and tools that will strengthen critical thinking skills and provide practical knowledge to explore and understand the world we live in. All workshops draw on the common theme of climate change to demonstrate real-world examples of where and how social research methods may be used and applied. 

There are no registration costs or fees involved. Registration is open to all University of Saskatchewan faculty, students and staff, and employees of government, non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations. All registrations are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

Participants may register in one or all of the workshops offered. Some workshops may require prior knowledge or another rethink research workshop as a prerequisite - please take note of this when registering.

Registration will open April 3, 2017.

A complete calendar of available rethink research workshops is provided below, along with individual detailed workshop overviews.

If you would like more information, please contact us.

 

 


Title:

Key Concepts and Considerations to Planning and Conducting Mixed Methods Research

Overview:

Using the writings of Creswell and Plano Clark, this lecture will introduce audience members to mixed methods research, including its philosophical foundations and history. We will also discuss some of the advantages and challenges that emerge when using mixed methods designs, and review considerations for designing a mixed methods study, including common design models. Further, we will review the various ways in which data may be collected in mixed methods studies.

Target Audience:

Undergraduate students interested in pursuing a graduate degree, graduate students interested in mixed methodologies, mixed methods researchers interested in utilizing SSRL services in their projects.

Instructor(s):

Marla Rogers, Mixed Methods Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 1, 2017

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM (1.5 Hours)

Room 213, Arts Building

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

30


Title:

Applying Mixed Methods to Wicked Problems

Overview:

Within a growing global, economic, political and social context, wicked problems are pervasive, prevalent and often difficult to solve. While not a cure-all for wicked problems, mixed methods research offers a pragmatic approach to learning and gaining insights that may be applied to complex issues. This workshop will provide an opportunity to practice the design and application of mixed methods to wicked problems using collaborative strategies. 

Target Audience:

Advanced undergraduate students studying in the social sciences, graduate students studying in the social sciences, junior academic researchers and community-based researchers working in mixed methodologies.

Instructor(s):

Marla Rogers, Mixed Methods Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 1, 2017

12:30 PM - 3:00 PM (2.5 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

20

Other Information:

Session: Key Concepts and Considerations to Planning and Conducting Mixed Methods Research recommended, but not required.


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of GIS, Cartography, and Spatial Analysis. Training on the theory, concepts, and practice of GIS will be covered. Participants will learn the basic building blocks of GIS, the opportunities available to users, and the limitations of its use. During the afternoon session, participants will work with spatial data in a commercial GIS software package (ArcGIS). They will also create their own first map. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Scott Bell (PhD), Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM (5 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop (all 5 hours) may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops later in the week. Later workshops may require this session.


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Georeferencing and Digitizing

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of georeferencing and digitizing. This will include the theory and practice of geocoding (turning street addresses into locations), georeferencing (making a digital image of a spatial representations viewable with other data in GIS), and digitizing (drawing geographically referencing features based on what is viewable on a georeferenced map). During the practical session, participants will georeference a scanned historical map and subsequently digitize features from it, for which tabular data is available. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Scott Bell (PhD), Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Spatial Analysis

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of spatial analysis tools in ArcGIS. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to perform various spatial analysis tools in ArcMap, perform a suitability analysis, and make a site selection. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Weiping (Winston) Zeng (PhD), GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Geocoding

Overview:

Participants will learn the various techniques of geocoding. This will include online geocoding tools and the practice of geocoding in ArcGIS. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Scott Bell (PhD), Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan

Tayyab Shah (PhD), Postdoctoral Fellow, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 4, 2017

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Spatial Statistics and GeoDa

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of spatial statistics. This will include theory and practice. During practical sessions (on Friday) participants will measure global and local spatial autocorrelation and build multivariate regression models for which they can assess the spatial autocorrelation and then create spatial regression models. The free and open-source software package GeoDa will be used. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Scott Bell (PhD), Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 4, 2017

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM (1 Hour)

and 

Friday, May 5, 2017

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Network Analysis

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of the ArcGIS Network Analyst extension. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to perform various network analyses in ArcMap (e.g., find routes, closes features on a network, calculate service areas and origin-destination cost matrices) and generate routes from one room to another room with our centerline database that has the room points of 20 buildings on campus. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Weiping (Winston) Zeng (PhD), GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 4, 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): ModelBuilder

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of the ModelBuilder in ArcGIS. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to understand the basic principles of working with ArcGIS ModelBuilder and use it to create a useful tool to execute a sequence of spatial analysis tools such as Union, Buffer, Erase, Intersect, Dissolve, Multipart to Single part, Select, and Clip. 

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Weiping (Winston) Zeng (PhD), GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 5, 2017

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

11

Other Information:

This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops happening otherwise during the week. 


Title:

Basic Statistics with R

Overview:

This workshop will provide an overview of R and will introduce concepts of basic statistics. R is a free, flexible and powerful open-source language for statistical analysis. In the first part of the workshop, participants will be introduced to basic R commands: installing packages, importing data from files and assigning variables. In the second part of the workshop, we will provide a hands-on introduction to concepts of basic statistics using R. Topics will include: descriptive statistics, visual data exploration, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation and regression, probability and sampling distributions, confidence intervals and significance tests. 

Target Audience:

Students (undergraduate and graduate), staff and faculty who have little or no experience with R and/or little or no previous exposure to basic statistics.

Instructor(s):

Ana-Maria Bogdan, Quantitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 8, 2017

9:00 AM - 1:00 PM (4 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL) 

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

20


Title:

Basic Survey Design

Overview:

This workshop will discuss basic concepts related to survey design. Attendees will be introduced to the various considerations that are required to construct a well-written and non-biased survey. Topics will include optimal question wording and order, question formats, optimizing and satisficing, minimizing socially desirable responding and pilot testing. The workshop will draw on theories from leading experts in the field of survey design, including Don Dillman and Jon Krosnick. At the end of the workshop, attendees should be able to:

  • Understand the basic techniques in survey design.
  • Identify poorly worded, biased, or misleading questions.
  • Construct well-designed survey questions that will answer their research questions.

Target Audience:

Individuals interested in survey design and administration who have little to no experience in item construction or surveying techniques or individuals who have experience in survey design and administration but have never received any formal training in the area.

Instructor(s):

Jessica McCutcheon, Survey Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 8, 2017

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM (2.5 Hours)

Room 207, Arts Building

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

25


Title:

Introduction to Experimental Methods

Overview:

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of experimental research and design relating to the social sciences. Through an experimental economic lens, this workshop will introduce an applied overview of the scientific method and basic considerations for developing experimental tasks. Attendees will gain hands-on experience in developing and designing their own experiments, and will be provided with an assortment of paper-and-pencil tools to construct and execute in-lab tasks. Registrants are encouraged to participate in experiments designed by their peers, and to discuss their results and project findings. Those who attend this workshop will learn how to develop their own ideas into testable hypotheses, and to critically evaluate experimental research methodology.

Target Audience:

This workshop is directed at any faculty member, staff member or student (undergraduate or graduate) who is interested in critically evaluating experimental research methodology. The workshop is also suited to those wishing to integrate experimental methods into their own line of research.

Instructor(s):

Brianna Groot, Experimental Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Guidon Fenig (PhD), Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

9:00 AM - 1:00 PM (4 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

40


Title:

Collecting and Analyzing Qualitative Data

Overview:

This workshop consists of two parts: In Part 1 (estimated length: 1 hour) we will discuss practical and logistic elements of collecting qualitative research data to better equip those conducting qualitative research with the skills and mindset necessary to effectively carry out their projects. Specifically, aspects such as ethical considerations, recruitment, setting up and conducting interviews and focus groups, organizing and managing data once it has been collected and preparing it for analysis will all be explored. Part 2 (estimated length: 2 hours) will introduce participants to the basics of NVivo 11 qualitative data analysis software to help manage, explore and categorize data to enhance thematic analysis skills.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for graduate students and/or faculty of any discipline who consider themselves novice in the field of qualitative research methods.

Instructor(s):

Rachel Tang, Qualitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM (3 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

20


Title:

An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Part 1

Overview:

Part 1 of the workshop will provide an introduction to social network concepts, theories, and substantive problems. A brief history of SNA will be given. Some research examples will be provided. Concepts, substantive topics, and theories will include social capital, Granovetter’s weak ties argument, Small World Studies, Burt’s structural holes argument, the application of SNA to collective action and social movements, amongst others.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for those who are interested in social network analysis (SNA), and are relative newcomers to SNA.

Instructor(s):

D.B. Tindall (PhD), Professor, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

25


Title:

An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Part 2

Overview:

In Part 2 of the workshop, emphasis will be given to data collection, particularly social survey methods. This part of the workshop will consider a variety of related methodological issues such as measurement, sampling, data analysis, and ethics, as well as the linkage of these issues to data collection. Different types of data collection techniques will be illustrated such as the name generator, position generator, and name roster. The different opportunities and constraints associated with data collection for whole versus ego-networks will be considered. Also, differences between one-mode and two-mode networks will be described. Some discussion of non-survey techniques may also be provided.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for those who are interested in social network analysis (SNA), and are relative newcomers to SNA.

Instructor(s):

D.B. Tindall (PhD), Professor, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM (3 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

25

Other Information:

Session: An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Part 1 recommended, but not required.


Title:

An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Part 3

Overview:

Part 3 of the workshop will focus on data management, descriptive social network statistics (e.g., network centrality, density, cliques, etc.), software (e.g. UCINET), and visualization (e.g. Netdraw). The main focus will be on using data with UCINET. Limited attention will be given to visualization, but some examples will be provided focusing on Netdraw, and possibly some alternative visualization packages (such as Pajek, and Visone). A brief discussion will also be given regarding advanced social network statistical procedures (such as ERGM and SIENA models).

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for those who are interested in social network analysis (SNA), and are relative newcomers to SNA.

Instructor(s):

D.B. Tindall (PhD), Professor, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 11, 2017

8:30 AM - 11:30 AM (3 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

25

Other Information:

Session: An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Parts 1 and 2 recommended, but not required.


Title:

An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Part 4

Overview:

Part 4 of the workshop will focus on qualitative and mixed methods approaches to social network analysis. Special emphasis in this portion of the workshop will be devoted to discourse network analysis. Here an overview of key concepts will be provided. Focus will be given to the software package, DNA. Other software may also be discussed (e.g. NVivo). Some examples may be given from a project on climate change discourse network analysis.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for those who are interested in social network analysis (SNA), and are relative newcomers to SNA.

Instructor(s):

D.B. Tindall (PhD), Professor, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 11, 2017

12:30 PM - 2:30 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

25

Other Information:

Session: An Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Parts 1, 2 and 3 recommended, but not required.


Title:

Introduction to Infographic Design and Application

Overview:

This workshop will introduce basic elements of infographic and graphic design and their application to the social sciences. Through the lens of climate change, we will discuss the importance and use of storyboarding, negative spacing, alignment and color and font choice. After a short didactic lecture, workshop participants will be introduced to an accessible design platform called Piktochart. Here, participants will gain hands-on experience through a guided tutorial of the infographic creation process. Finally, participants will be encouraged to apply their learned skills by individually creating their own graphics while receiving personalized feedback. Those who attend this workshop will learn to critically evaluate and apply design principles that may be used to enhance a breadth of projects.

Target Audience:

This workshop is directed at any faculty member, staff member or student (undergraduate or graduate) who is interested in learning fundamental design principles and applying them to their own work.

Instructor(s):

Simon Huang, MD Candidate, University of Regina

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 11, 2017

2:30 PM - 4:30 PM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

20

Other Information:

Participants are encouraged, but not required to bring their own materials for the final stage of this workshop.


Title:

Using Triangulation to Improve Credibility and Validity

Overview:

Triangulation is a powerful and practical technique that facilitates the validation of data through cross verification from two or more data sources, investigators, theories or methods. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the concept of triangulation, including its history, theory, concepts and application. Through lecture that draws on mixed-methods theory and design and hands-on activities, participants will be guided through steps to developing and implementing triangulation in their own research. Pros and cons of triangulation will be discussed and explored as a potential means to overcome research bias.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for new or established scholars interested in learning about or employing triangulation techniques in their own research.

Instructor(s):

Jason Disano, Director, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 12, 2017

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM (2 Hours)

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)

Maximum Number of Registrants Permitted:

20