Research Methods Summer Institute

Join us for rethink research, the SSRL Research Methods Summer Institute, May 6 - 17, 2019.

A unique and exciting training opportunity, rethink research consists of numerous hands-on, immersive workshops aimed at providing participants with practical, usable knowledge and skills in the social science research methods. Through a combination of lectures and hands-on exercises, including specialized software training, workshop participants are exposed to a variety of methods and tools that strengthen critical thinking skills and provide practical knowledge to explore and understand the world we live in. All workshops draw on the common theme of climate change to demonstrate real-world examples of where and how social research methods may be used and applied. 

Registration is open to all University of Saskatchewan faculty, students and staff, and employees of government, non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations. All registrations are processed on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants may register in one or more of the workshops offered. Registrations are limited, and individual workshops fill up quickly!

All registrants are required to pay a refundable deposit of $50.00 per registered workshop. For example, a registrant attending one workshop is required to provide to the SSRL a refundable deposit of $50.00, while a registrant attending five workshops is required to provide to the SSRL a refundable deposit of $250.00. The refundable deposit must be provided to the SSRL to complete the registration process and reserve the workshop seat(s). The refundable deposit of $50.00 per registered workshop is being collected by the SSRL to ensure registrants attend the session(s) for which they are registered. Deposit refunds will be provided after attending the registered session(s). Procedures for providing and receiving returned deposits from the SSRL are outlined on the registration website.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

A complete calendar of rethink research workshops is provided below, along with individual detailed workshop overviews.

If you would like more information, please contact us.


Quantitative Methods Workshops


Introduction to Quantitative Analysis and SPSS

Overview:

This workshop introduces participants to the basic theories and concepts of quantitative research and analysis using SPSS. A brief introductory lecture covers such concepts as types of variables, reliability versus validity, levels of measurement, differences between descriptive and inferential statistics, and various types of analyses that may be employed in quantitative research. The majority of the workshop employs a hands-on approach, introducing participants to the basics of using SPSS. A number of topics are covered including an overview of the SPSS interface, data modification and data file manipulation, descriptive statistics, visual aids, and associations and correlations.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for those new to quantitative research and SPSS, or those seeking to refresh their knowledge and skills.

Instructor(s):

Ana-Maria Bogdan, Quantitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Jason Disano, Director, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 13, 2019

9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Room 161, Murray Library


Introduction to Experimental Methods

Overview:

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of experimental research and design relating to the social sciences. Participants will learn how experiments can add value to their own research stream by allowing them make inferences about the causality and direction of their observations. Through the lens of climate change, we will discuss an applied overview of the scientific method and basic considerations for developing experimental tasks. Attendees will gain hands-on experience in designing and developing their own experiments, and will be provided with paper-and-pencil materials to guide them through the process. Registrants will be encouraged to participate in experiments designed by their peers and to engage in informal conversation as they discuss their rationale and outcomes. Those who attend this workshop will learn how experiments can augment their own research and how to develop their own ideas into testable hypotheses. No previous background in experimental design is required.

Target Audience:

This workshop is directed at any faculty member, staff member or student (undergraduate or graduate) who is curious about experimental research methodology, or who would like to integrate experimental methods into their own research stream.

Instructor(s):

Brianna Groot, Experimental Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 13, 2019

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Basic Survey Design

Overview:

This workshop will discuss basic concepts related to survey design. Attendees will be introduced to the various considerations that are required to construct a well-written and non-biased survey. Topics will include optimal question wording and order, question formats, optimizing and satisficing, minimizing socially desirable responding, and pilot testing. The workshop will draw on theories from leading experts in the field of survey design, including Don Dillman and Jon Krosnick. At the end of the workshop attendees should be able to:

    • Understand the basic techniques in survey design.
    • Identify poorly worded, biased, or misleading questions.
    • Construct well-designed survey questions that will answer their research questions. 

Target Audience:

Individuals interested in survey design and administration who have little to no experience in item construction or surveying techniques or individuals who have experience in survey design and administration but have never received any formal training in the area.

Instructor(s):

Stan Yu, Survey Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Logistic Regression Model Building: A Tale of Two Outcomes

Overview:

This workshop will provide an introduction to Logistic Regression (modeling a binary outcome variable). The workshop will first provide some general theoretical background to Logistic Regression and some corresponding real-world applications. The applications will include how to build and interpret Logistic Regression Models. The second part of the workshop introduces participants to developing Logistic Regression Models using the software package SPSS.

Target Audience:

Students (undergraduate/graduate), faculty, and staff, who would like to know how to build predictive models for a binary outcome but lack the statistical knowledge to do so.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Michael Szafron, Associate Professor, School of Public Health

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

1:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Room 161, Murray Library


Introduction to Ego-Nets

Overview:

This workshop will provide a broad overview of Social Network Analysis. In the first part of the workshop, a concise overview of theoretical concepts will be provided, together with examples of data collection methods. The second section will discuss ego network data analysis - network measurements (i.e. density, reciprocity, composition etc.). The last part of the workshop introduces participants to UCINET and NetDraw, software packages used for data management, analysis and visualization.

Target Audience:

Students (undergraduate and graduate), staff and faculty who have little or no experience with UCINET and NetDraw and/or little or no previous exposure to social network analysis.

Instructor(s):

Ana-Maria Bogdan, Quantitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Room 132, Thorvaldson Building


An Introduction to Survival Analysis

Overview:

Researchers often deal with research questions related to the speed at which a particular event happens and the analysis of factors that can delay or accelerate its occurrence. The goal of this workshop will be to familiarize participants with the methodology of survival analysis and to provide a basic understanding of its utility and performance. Participants will understand the concept of survival analysis and its basic statistical principles, data requirements, and performance in SPSS. The session will include guided hands-on analytical practice with a dataset in SPSS and interpretation of its results.

Target Audience:

This session is appropriate for quantitative or mixed methods researchers with minimal or no statistical knowledge of survival analysis. No specific statistical/software knowledge is required.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Prosanta Mondal, Clinical Research Support Unit, College of Medicine

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Room 132, Thorvaldson Building


Qualitative Methods Workshops


Collecting Qualitative Data

Overview:

How to conduct qualitative research needs to be made more salient for those who wish to include qualitative data collection in their methodological arsenal. Throughout the project life cycle, there are several practical, logistic, and ethical processes that need to be taken into consideration to ensure best practice when collecting and administering one-on-one and/or focus group interviews. This workshop provides consultation and advice to those wishing to tackle qualitative research with no prior experience, and will include lessons learned from specific research studies. How to formulate interview and focus group protocols/questions, what steps are involved to recruit for/arrange/setup interviews, data management (audio recording, tracking), and how to transcribe data and prepare it for analysis are all topics to be explored. As well, how such considerations may change depending on the context/landscape of data collection (in-person, over-the-phone, web conferencing) will be identified. The first hour will be primarily lecture-based, and the last half of the workshop will be dedicated to small exercises to help participants build interviewing skills. Time will be reserved for a brief Q&A period.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for undergraduate and/or graduate students and/or faculty of any discipline who consider themselves novice in the field of qualitative research methods. Specifically, this training is meant for those who will have to/have had to collect/organize one-on-one and/or focus group interviews for their own studies.

Instructor(s):

Rachel Tang, Qualitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 6, 2019

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Analyzing Qualitative Data: NVivo 12 Pro for Windows

Overview:

In this workshop, a mixture of basic- and intermediate-level features of the NVivo 12 Pro for Windows qualitative analysis software suite will be presented using sample data. The agenda may include but is not limited to covering the following: importing data, organizing data, exploratory queries (word frequency, text search, coding query) and their visual outputs, coding and creating a node hierarchy, visualizations (maps and/or charts, diagrams), working with survey data, and collaborative features of NVivo (for those doing teamwork). Through these various interactions with the NVivo interface, the audience will also learn about the process of performing qualitative analyses more broadly, thereby leaving participants with both technical and analytical knowledge to inform their own analyses.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for undergraduate and/or graduate students and/or faculty of any discipline who consider themselves novice in the field of qualitative research methods. Specifically, this training is meant for those who will have to conduct qualitative analyses and wish to utilize the NVivo software suite to do so.

Instructor(s):

Rachel Tang, Qualitative Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL - QSR NVivo Certified Expert (2018)

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Monday, May 6, 2019

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Room 161, Murray Library


Mixed Methods Workshops


Mixed Methods Research: Key Concepts and Considerations

Overview:

This lecture will introduce audience members to the emerging field of Mixed Methods research. We will discuss some of the advantages and challenges that emerge when using Mixed Methods designs, and review considerations for designing an Mixed Methods study, including some of the common design models. Further, we will review the various ways in which data can be collected in Mixed Methods studies. By the end of this session, the audience will be able to articulate the advantages and challenges of Mixed Methods research and plan a basic Mixed Methods study in their field of research.

Target Audience:

Undergraduate students interested in pursuing a graduate degree, graduate students interested in mixed methodologies, mixed methods researchers interested in utilizing SSRL services in their projects.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Janel Fergusson, Mixed Methods Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 16, 2019

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Wicked Problems: Using Mixed Methods Research to Address Pervasive, Prevalent, and Difficult Problems

Overview:

Within a growing global, economic, political, and social context, wicked problems are pervasive, prevalent, and difficult to solve. While not a cure-all for wicked problems, mixed methods research offers a pragmatic approach to learning and gaining insights that can be applied to complex issues. This workshop will provide an opportunity to practice the design and application of mixed methods to wicked problems using collaborative strategies. Session: Mixed Methods Research: Key Concepts and Considerations recommended, but not required.

Target Audience:

Undergraduate students interested in pursuing a graduate degree, graduate students interested in mixed methodologies, mixed methods researchers interested in utilizing SSRL services in their projects.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Janel Fergusson, Mixed Methods Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 16, 2019

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Program Evaluation

Overview:

Program Evaluation is the systematic assessment of the design, implementation, or results of a project, program, or initiative for the purposes of learning or decision-making (Canadian Evaluation Society, 2014). Program evaluation can be a powerful tool for any organizational endeavor in any sector. This workshop will provide an introduction to program evaluation and how to conduct program evaluation, as well its connection to social science research; and how it can be used in the university setting. This workshop will be interactive and participants will be encouraged to bring topics that they would be interested in evaluating, as the workshop will use those topics as starting points to guide participants through how to develop and design their own evaluation projects. No previous background in program evaluation is required.

Target Audience:

This workshop is directed at any faculty member, staff member or student (undergraduate or graduate) who is interested in learning more about program evaluation and how it can help to support their organization, initiatives and/or programs.

Instructor(s):

Stan Yu, Survey Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 16, 2019

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Using Triangulation to Improve Credibility and Validity

Overview:

Triangulation is a powerful and practical technique that facilitates the validation of data through cross verification from two or more data sources, investigators, theories or methods. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the concept of triangulation, including its history, theory, concepts and application. Through lecture that draws on mixed-methods theory and design and hands-on activities, participants will be guided through steps to developing and implementing triangulation in their own research. Pros and cons of triangulation will be discussed and explored as a potential means to overcome research bias.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for new or established scholars interested in learning about or employing triangulation techniques in their own research.

Instructor(s):

Jason Disano, Director, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 17, 2019

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


The Complexity Turn and the Social Sciences: Theoretical and Methodological Innovations

Overview:

The complexity turn marks an epistemic break, a paradigmatic shift, and a scientific revolution. Within contemporary sciences, including social sciences, this paradigmatic transition is manifested as a growing perception that contemporary theories, sources of data and data analysis techniques, if not obsolete, are inadequate, and, therefore, no longer fit for purpose. Signs of this scientific revolution, and various reactions to it, abound. In the social sciences, for example, reactionary responses take both ‘pro-modern’ and anti-modern forms. The pro-modern reactions include a conservative backlash among disciplinary fundamentalists. The anti-modern reactions include nihilistic post-modernist rejection of reason and rationality, and some post-colonial initiatives that may contribute to a neo-traditionalization of knowledge and ways of knowing. These developments, among others, necessitate a rethinking of research. To that end, this workshop has three interrelated objectives:

    • To briefly overview theories of complex systems.
    • To identify specific features of complex social systems.
    • To explore the ways in which mixed methods of data collection and analysis address challenges elicited by the complexity turn.

Target Audience:

This workshop is intended for social science faculty, graduate and senior undergraduate students.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Harley D. Dickinson, Professor, Department of Sociology

Jason Disano, Director, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 17, 2019

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Workshops


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of GIS, Cartography, and Spatial Analysis. Training on the theory, concepts, and practice of GIS will be covered. Participants will learn the basic building blocks of GIS, the opportunities available to users, and the limitations of its use. During the afternoon session, participants will work with spatial data in a commercial GIS software package (ArcGIS). They will also create their own first map. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Georeferencing and Digitizing

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of georeferencing and digitizing. This will include the theory and practice of geocoding (turning street addresses into locations), georeferencing (making a digital image of a spatial representations viewable with other data in GIS), and digitizing (drawing geographically referencing features based on what is viewable on a georeferenced map). During the practical session, participants will georeference a scanned historical map and subsequently digitize features from it, for which tabular data is available. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Spatial Analysis

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of spatial analysis tools in ArcGIS. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to perform various spatial analysis tools in ArcMap, perform a suitability analysis, and make a site selection. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Geocoding

Overview:

Participants will learn the various techniques of geocoding. This will include online geocoding tools and the practice of geocoding in ArcGIS. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 9, 2019

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Network Analysis

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of the ArcGIS Network Analyst extension. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to perform various network analyses in ArcMap (e.g., find routes, closes features on a network, calculate service areas and origin-destination cost matrices) and generate routes from one room to another room with our centerline database that has the room points of 20 buildings on campus. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Thursday, May 9, 2019

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Spatial Statistics

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of spatial statistics. This will include theory and practice. During practical sessions, participants will measure global and local spatial autocorrelation and build multivariate regression models for which they can assess the spatial autocorrelation and then create spatial regression models. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 10, 2019

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): ModelBuilder

Overview:

Participants will receive an overview of ModelBuilder in ArcGIS. This will include theory and practice. By the end of this workshop, students will be able to understand the basic principles of working with ArcGIS ModelBuilder and use it to create a useful tool to execute a sequence of spatial analysis tools such as Union, Buffer, Erase, Intersect, Dissolve, Multipart to Single part, Select, and Clip. This workshop may be taken on its own or integrated with other Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshops.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, research staff, and faculty who want to familiarize themselves with GIS and the tools of mapping.

Instructor(s):

Dr. Weiping (Winston) Zeng, GIS Research Manager and Specialist, SSRL

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Friday, May 10, 2019

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)


SNA Discussion Group

Organized by our Social Network Laboratory (SNL), the Social Network Analysis Discussion Group was established to bring together faculty, students and the general public who have experience or an interest in exploring and studying social networks. Through a monthly discussion series, we hope the discussion group will help to build and enhance community, collaboration, and knowledge and awareness of social network analysis, covering areas that range from basic research on social networks to advanced methods of network analysis.

Title

Indigenous post-disaster resilience: Using SNA and Qualitative Comparative Analysis to unpack Māori wellbeing following the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes

Abstract

Following the 2010-11 earthquakes in Christchurch, Simon’s research has focused on disaster risk reduction for Indigenous communities with particular interest in urban Indigenous groups. He has taught a variety of courses in Indigenous planning and development and will be teaching Aboriginal Development (INDG 265) in the Fall semester, and a Special Topic on International Indigenous Disaster Risk Reduction (INDG 398) in 2018.

Biography

Dr. Simon J. Lambert is from Aotearoa New Zealand and is a member of the Tuhoe and Ngati Ruapani tribes. His doctoral research was on small-scale Maori horticulture and he was awarded his PhD in 2008 from Lincoln University. Prior to that he was awarded a MA (Hons) degree from the University of Canterbury after researching the assessment of environmental vulnerability in the Pacific.

Date, Time and Location

Friday, April 26, 2019
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Room 256, Arts Building

Due to limited space availability, please RSVP to Ana-Maria Bogdan at ana.bogdan@usask.ca.

NVivo Training

The SSRL offers regularly-scheduled training in NVivo 12 Pro for Windows, led by SSRL Qualitative Research Manager and Specialist and NVivo Certified Expert, Rachel Tang.

The two-hour introductory NVivo 12 Pro for Windows training session utilizes a hands-on approach with a sample data set. The instructor introduces users to working with data in NVivo (importing, opening, and organizing various file types), guides learners through exploring and coding data in order to analyze for themes, and demonstrates novel program features. This workshop is most helpful for beginners or those who would like a refresher on how to manage and categorize data in order to enhance their thematic analysis skills and gain overall insight as to how NVivo for Windows is used in qualitative research.

Registration is open to all University of Saskatchewan faculty, students and staff, and employees of government, non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations. Registrations are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

REGISTER HERE

Cost

$50.00 plus GST. A cancellation fee of $20.00 plus GST is assessed if canceled at least one week prior to the session. Refunds will not be issued if canceled within one week of the session.

Upcoming Sessions

  • Friday, April 26, 2019, 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM

All sessions are held in the Murray Library, Room 161.

For more information, please contact the course instructor at rachel.tang@usask.ca or (306) 966-6319.

An Introduction to Choice Modelling

Overview:

This workshop will introduce the concepts and practice of discrete choice modelling. By the end of the workshop, participants will:

  1. Understand the conceptual framework underlying discrete choice models;
  2. Gain experience estimating and interpreting these models using actual data sets in R; and
  3. Be able to describe the strengths and limitations of alternative discrete choice models.

Target Audience:

The workshop is targeted at researchers interested in quantitative modelling of human choices whether that be in economics, marketing, health, engineering, planning, transportation or other areas. Prior experience with R and RStudio is recommended.

Instructor(s):

Patrick Lloyd-Smith, Assistant Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics and Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan

Date, Time and Location Offered:

Wednesday, August 7, 2019
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room 260, Arts Building (SSRL)
 

Registration Process:

Due to limited space availability, please contact Ana-Maria Bogdan at ana.bogdan@usask.ca to register for this workshop.

A complementary session Introduction to R Studio will be provided on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 (10:00 AM - 12:00 PM) for those who are unfamiliar with using R. Please contact Ana-Maria Bogdan at ana.bogdan@usask.ca for more information, or to register for this complementary session.

SSRL YouTube Channel

The SSRL YouTube Channel features new and archived videos from select SSRL workshops, lectures and events.